Week 2: Final Display Practice

During the exhibition committee’s meeting, we decided that I would be on the beams within the main studio space with natural light behind my pieces. I decided on two triptych’s that face each other to have a conversation between the photographic and sculptural elements that are being hinted at. The final display would use 1.5mm twisted wire cable that would be strong enough to hold the Perspex that I have ordered, while also hanging straight. The thickness of the wire also hints at the paper I have stripped away from the photographs and the emptiness of the photograms in a sculptural form. Being sandwiched in Perspex, the conversation deepens between sculpture and light as well as photography, blurring the lines between them and questioning whether there should be any lines at all.

I also decided to name my piece ‘Levels’ for it relates to many of the elements within the piece including that of the levels of stairs, the levels of which the triptychs are hung as well as the levels of inter-connectivity between sculpture, light and photography. This aids the conversation between the three elements of what my work looks at, and allows the viewer to decide whether there are levels between these, or whether it is one long spectrum that joins them together.

Summer Week 1: Final Display Planning

Over Easter, I originally designed four different layouts for the final, summative exhibition. I based a lot of this on the Week 8 exhibition where I found the circles and continuation of the stairs off of the piece to be very successful. These original designs were very full on, taking into account everything that I had done; cyanotypes, photograms, prints that had been cut into and the matchstick stairs. I wanted to display too much.

After a much needed conversation about my work, I realised that the simplicity of the piece worked best in the Week 8 exhibition. I had originally crossed the boundaries by making sculpture into a photographic substance, but I wanted to cross it the other way this time by making the photographic substance, sculptural.

After much deliberation, I needed to step away from the automatic reaction to display things in a frame, and decided to utilise the cut out elements as the missing sculpture. By sandwiching the triptych of individual photographs in Perspex sheets, the light will be able to pass through and highlight this element. I would hang the photographs with cut out stairs from the beams in the art department in somewhere with lots of natural light. I would then hang a triptych of photograms from another beam near by, so that they are in conversation with each other. Because the photograms will not have the stairs cut out, I may have one on each side so that there are a total of three triptych’s in total. This is what I aim to experiment in the department with string and plastic sleeves.

With the perspex, I am also looking to hang it with wire for a seamless look. I would also prefer wire to a thicker chain as it hints towards the thin lines that have been cut from the photograph, and almost translated into the material it now hangs from.

Above: A selection of possible display formats for the photograph set, and the up-to six photograms.

Easter 4: Shadow Stairs and Photographs

Building up from the feedback and ideas from the week 8 exhibition, I wanted to explore the use of the light against the stairs and projections of the corresponding, or similar photographs that I had previously taken. I was also planning to use plinths around the department to create a blocked sculpture, however I could not find many and this would have been difficult to manipulate in the time frame I had nor complete the goal that I had in mind. I instead used my stairs, laying them on top of the OHP in a corresponding manner and a random angle to the image, and dangling them in from to create an suggestion of a shadow. I found that the ‘wrong direction’ stairs that were directly on top of the OHP surface worked the best as it created another suggestion of a staircase, while also producing interesting shadows both on the wall and the staircase itself. Despite the experimentation, I do not think that I want to go down this avenue further as I enjoy playing with light in a photographic manner with the subject of something that is sculptural.

Easter 3: Cutting Photographic Prints

I wanted to further investigate the impact of cutting prints of photographs that I had taken after initially producing a small number of these. I wanted to go larger too, to see if this impacted the experience of the viewer from these empty spaces, determining what the stairs looked like, or the environment that they are supposed to belong in. I wanted them to be varying sizes so that I can display them alongside my photograms and cyanotypes as a juxtaposition and a hint to the different photographic methods that I have used alongside sculpture.

Due to the fragile nature of these prints, I would prefer that they are framed prior to exhibiting. With the larger prints that I have not yet cut into, it may be possible to leave ore on the photo to give a glimpse of the surroundings, unlike any other medium that I have used.

Small:
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Big:
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Small:
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Small:
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Big:
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Easter 2: Cyanotypes

I previously worked on cyanotypes in week 11, playing with the different stairs that I had produced and the strong shadows that the sun was producing. They were very strong, creating stark contrasts between the stairs print and the blue of the cyanotype chemical. This collection of cyanotypes were lighter than previous attempts, for reasons I was unsure of. Al of them were very shadowed (despite the images being clear, but this was an auto-correction on behalf of the camera). I enjoyed the manipulation of the light to create ‘new’ stairs for malformed shadows due to the strong sunlight. Although these pieces are relatively small and despite wanting to go bigger, I hope to use some of them in relation to the photograms and photographs for my summative piece.

Easter 1: Photograms

These photograms are an extension of the earlier collection of photograms that I produced from the original three sets of matchstick staircases. I enjoyed creating this first set within the boundaries of smaller paper, but through the exploration of several staircases on one piece of paper with the cyanotypes, I wanted to translate this into the dark room.

I used several techniques including double exposure with two different staircases, double exposure with small movement of paper and layering to create a forced perspective on the flat piece of paper. The individual staircases on smaller pieces of paper are effective and give the perspective of going further off into the distance, past the paper. The photograms with multiple staircases give the same effect, but are clearer and more distinct than the cyanotypes produced in the same manner. I wish to use these in my summative exhibition as a nod to the notion of a larger staircase with other pieces also being displayed along side these.

Bloomin’ Exhibition London, Art Clubbers

I was invited to Stour Space, London, as part of Art Clubbers first exhibition, Bloomin’ – Growing into Art. This was somewhat a familiar experience of setting up exhibitions and collaborating together to ensure that all pieces were hung in a suitable time, and getting everyone the space that they wanted. I exhibited I Am Not The Label You Give Me as a set, the first time they have been framed after the Study Abroad exhibition earlier in the year. Stour Space is a gallery and working space for artists, and I enjoyed the set up of the gallery as well as it not being a clean cut space – it has been well loved and I feel like that not only added to my piece, but also the exhibition as a whole.

The opening was very exciting, with lots of people engaging and commenting on the works. It was the only photographic piece there and stood out due to its clear position from the door of the gallery, as well as the clear cut mode of presentation. Doing this exhibition has spurred me on to enter more calls for submissions in different areas to see my work in more of a professional space.

All images courtesy of Art Clubbers Facebook – Bloomin’ Into Art