The Story Behind Megadoku

As part of Project 365 in May, I completed a 50 x 50 cm canvas of a 10 x 10 large sudoku on an 8 x 8 grid. Using pastel colours in acrylic paint, the calm and soft hues change throughout the day depending on the light that streams through my studio window. It was the first canvas that I have completed in a long time, and although it took several days, I feel proud of this achievement.

A sudoku can be defined as “a puzzle in which players insert the numbers one to nine into a grid consisting of nine squares subdivided into a further nine smaller squares in such a way that every number appears one in each horizonal line, vertical line, and square.”

A megadoku is generally considered a sudoku larger than this nine by nine grid. As a child, and even now as an adult, I deeply enjoy sitting down with a puzzle book and completing sudoku after sudoku after sudoku. The patterns that are within these have also intrigued me, seeing them as perhaps colours, or indeed larger artworks.

It was this inspiration of the patterns and the soothing nature of painting that inspired me to crack out a canvas. I worked through each colour, ensuring I kept to the pattern of the 10 x 10 megadoku. I was originally going to curve the pattern around the sides of the canvas as the canvas is around an inch thick. As I continued to paint the canvas, I decided to keep these sides white and clean, with the final design being the central 8 x 8 grid of the 10 x 10 megadoku.

I enjoyed the painting process of this, following the straight lines and cutting into the corners of each square. A part of me wishes to create a larger version of this, using both a bigger pattern and larger square canvas. In the meantime, I enjoy the view of this painting every day as it hangs above my desk.

Stasis

Date: March 2020
Size: 2 x 2.5 x 2.5 ft
Material: Bamboo, twine, plaster

Gravity takes its toll when adding weight. Unpolished, it could be disturbed by a simple knock or push. Holding itself in the moment. Two materials forced into a moulded relationship, to work together, to balance. Too heavy to hold itself without support.

Percolate

Size: NA
Date: December 2019
Medium: Bamboo, plaster, jesmonite, twine, electrical tape, nails

Balancing, Holding, Relating. A focus on materiality and construction with the every day. Gravity, tension and a harmony amongst opposition is taken into account through the interaction with the environment.

Percolate is there to make you think differently about the building; perhaps in the way you physically interact with it, showcasing the smaller forgotten elements and details hidden in each of the rooms of the unique building, or what the building is and how we view it.

Through the use of sculpture, natural and modern building materials, Abraham is able to consider her own application of simplicity and tension.

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