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Artist Influences and Research Summer Assessment 2017

Donald Hamilton Fraser RA

Donald Hamilton Fraser has exhibited around the world, while also being made a Fellow of the Royal College of Art in 1970, Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Art in 1983, and then elected Royal Academician in 1985. His paintings are composed of the sea, in block and contrasting colours. The sea itself, in many of his paintings, the sea is represented by only two or three variations of blue, and contrasted against the sky, which is another blue entirely. The seascapes and other landscapes that he paints are very vivid, only using light and bright colours, with very little use of darker colours, and almost no use of black at all. These colours create a warm, and calm atmosphere within each of the paintings. These colours are only used in block, and are rarely mixed in with one another. This use of blocking colours adds a level of simplicity to each of the paintings. The simplicity, and the calm atmosphere couple to create soft and smooth paintings of seascapes.


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2 replies on “Donald Hamilton Fraser RA”

[…] Donald Hamilton Fraser RA uses a soft, complimentary colour palette to paint seascapes. These blues, yellows, whites, and deep greens, are colours that I wish to explore when looking at painting the miniature figurines. I chose the colour palette of this artist, as I wanted to create that same soft use of block colours, even when the scene in its entirety is going to very full and giving a sense of panic. I also wish to see how the colour palette will change the views of the piece, and whether adding more red, for example, will make people think that there is more death in the piece. […]

[…] Donald Hamilton Fraser RA uses a soft, complimentary colour palette to paint seascapes. These blues, yellows, whites, and deep greens, are colours that I wish to explore when looking at painting the miniature figurines. I chose the colour palette of this artist, as I wanted to create that same soft use of block colours, even when the scene in its entirety is going to very full and giving a sense of panic. I also wish to see how the colour palette will change the views of the piece, and whether adding more red, for example, will make people think that there is more death in the piece. […]

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